Moving from mechanicals to fixed - Mississippi Hunting and Fishing Forums
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Old 07-28-2020, 03:44 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Moving from mechanicals to fixed

I've decided to transition from my Rage mechanicals to fixed broadheads. The primary reason is I do so much hunting from the ground. I need a broadhead that will stay put when I bump into limbs, brush, etc.

Here's the thing: I know very little about fixed broadheads, so for the purposes of this thread assume I'm a beginner.

The mechanicals I use - the "original" 2-blade expandable - fly exactly like my field points. So I've got 1/2 doz or so arrows with field points and a few with the Rage practice points. The target I use is NOT for use with fixed broadheads, so I assume my first order of business is to buy a new target, correct?

And since I need to practice with my broadheads - and not field points like I do now - I'll need to buy 2x as many broadheads as I need for hunting so I can use the others for practice, correct?

Can fixed broadheads fired into a target be used for hunting, so long as I can sharpen them adequately? Or is it best to reserve some for practice and never use the "hunting" heads for anything other than shooting at a deer?

To y'all experts these will sound like silly "newbie" questions, which is exactly my purpose.

thanks for all input!
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Old 07-28-2020, 03:58 PM   #2 (permalink)
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There are many options available to you; but I will offer some ideas for your consideration. First, if you tune your arrows to the bow like the Ranch Fairy explains, field points and broadheads should group the same with rare exception. If you do this, you can get a cheaper target just to confirm your field points and broadheads group the same. I like shooting broadheads so I keep some good broadhead targets. The Block targets are good...but expensive. I like a target I think they call the Blob...can shoot a million times in it for little money but its too heavy to ship so you have to get one at a 3-D shoot when the guy that has them comes around.

Stinger broadheads (Magnus) are well known to 'group just like a field point' and they are extremely easy to re-sharpen with a KME sharpener. Mr. Gillette would be envious, but it only works on the two blade design which I prefer anyway. Its a stainless steel design so once sharpened, they pretty much stay sharp the entire season. If you go down this path, I will give you more info on how to use the sharpener. I love the Stinger head on some of my arrow setups. I've killed a ton of deer with them.

If you hate spending time sharpening, even an accusharp does an acceptable job on these heads with a few strokes... and you can get them at most hardware stores.

Last edited by Stringwacker; 07-28-2020 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 07-28-2020, 04:31 PM   #3 (permalink)
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There's also the option of using a fixed blade broadhead with replaceable blade, if you don't want to try sharpening. In fact, muzzys have practice blades also. Maybe some of the others do as well.
I just purchased a stay sharp guide. Pretty cheap option for sharpening blades. www.staysharpguide.com
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Old 07-28-2020, 04:38 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Stringwacker View Post
There are many options available to you; but I will offer some ideas for your consideration. First, if you tune your arrows to the bow like the Ranch Fairy explains, field points and broadheads should group the same with rare exception. If you do this, you can get a cheaper target just to confirm your field points and broadheads group the same. I like shooting broadheads so I keep some good broadhead targets. The Block targets are good...but expensive. I like a target I think they call the Blob...can shoot a million times in it for little money but its too heavy to ship so you have to get one at a 3-D shoot when the guy that has them comes around.

Stinger broadheads (Magnus) are well known to 'group just like a field point' and they are extremely easy to re-sharpen with a KME sharpener. Mr. Gillette would be envious, but it only works on the two blade design which I prefer anyway. Its a stainless steel design so once sharpened, they pretty much stay sharp the entire season. If you go down this path, I will give you more info on how to use the sharpener. I love the Stinger head on some of my arrow setups. I've killed a ton of deer with them.

If you hate spending time sharpening, even an accusharp does an acceptable job on these heads with a few strokes... and you can get them at most hardware stores.
THANK YOU, Stringwacker! Ok...I like several things you mentioned. First, the 2-blade design sounds good to me, and I DO NOT mind sharpening. After hunting and playing guitar, my next passion is cooking. And Im obsessive about my knives being shave-my-face sharp! I don't own the KME sharpener, but I've got several others, including the Darex Work Sharp system with pretty much every option and attachment! I've been known to sit and binge-watch entire Netflix series with my wife while sharpening every knife in the house, LOL!

I'm very interested in the heavy FOC approach of the Ranch Fairy, and I don't mind sharpening. So....???

I want an archery setup that lends itself to hunting from the ground, with most shot opportunities in the 10-20 yard range.
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Old 07-28-2020, 04:38 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonhuntin View Post
There's also the option of using a fixed blade broadhead with replaceable blade, if you don't want to try sharpening. In fact, muzzys have practice blades also. Maybe some of the others do as well.
I just purchased a stay sharp guide. Pretty cheap option for sharpening blades. www.staysharpguide.com
Good point...the Stinger offers replaceable blades as well.
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Old 07-28-2020, 05:13 PM   #6 (permalink)
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The bigger issue may be how you gain the higher FOC and tune your arrow. I watched only one of the Ranch Fairy's youtube video's...and it was about bareshafting. Nothing he said was wrong; but in the context of simplicity...it didn't provide much on the 'how you do it aspect'

His video actually showed a nock right situation which would have required more FOC weight for the bareshaft to have entered the target straight. Perhaps on a compound its not critical; but it would have been hard to shoot a recurve with what he showed. He left more out than he included.

You need to start with a slightly over-spined arrow and add weight to the front to center the bareshaft arrow flight. For a RH shooter, A nock right means to add weight to the front of the arrow. A nock left means to reduce weight to the front of the arrow. A nock low means to raise your nocking point and vice -versa if it hits too high.

Adding weight can be done many ways. Adding a heavier broadhead is the easiest but it narrows your selection choices. (For example a Stinger only comes in 125 and 150 weights in the two blade). Often people use glue on broadheads and glue to a broadhead adapter which can make a 125 grain head turn into anything from a 161 grain head to a 250 grain head depending on what broadhead adapter is used.

Yet still, there are internal and external weights that can be added. External weights are just 5 grain brass washers which you can add as many as three behind the broadhead, (These are good for fine tuning when you get it close)There are internal weights that screw in the back of some inserts/brands of arrows that allow 10 to 100 grains to be inserted in the tube. Its all get a bit complex and I'm sure that is why the Ranch Fairy didn't go there.

If you struggle with the concept, I have a lifetime supply of different broadheads, field points, broadhead adaptors,weights for FOC options. I may not be able to tune a compound, but would offer my assistance to try if you wanted to come by my home one day. I'm sure I know more about bare shaft tuning with weights than the majority of archery shops. I owe you for the Mississippi Post Roast idea... best thing I ever ate!

Last edited by Stringwacker; 07-28-2020 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 07-29-2020, 08:52 AM   #7 (permalink)
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From what I saw on the THP video with Ranch Fairy he seems very much into trial and error. I was surprised that he didn’t know more details of tuning.
I might take a look at the Helix from Tim Strickland.

Last edited by jlt; 07-29-2020 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 07-30-2020, 08:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
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The only fixed head I’ve ever shot that flew true was a Muzzy MX3. Others may fly great in a well tuned bow, I’m sure my bow wasn’t well tuned at the time. I’ve shot spitfires for the last 15 years and wouldn’t think of switching to anything else.
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Old 07-31-2020, 03:28 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I’ve shot spitfires for the last 15 years and wouldn’t think of switching to anything else.
I have NOTHING against mechanicals from a strictly performance standpoint. But I stalk with my bow WAY more than I sit or use a stand. And even when I use a stand I often walk 1/2 mile or more. As I'm working through these thick river bottoms I'm constandly bumping my knocked arrow into stuff. Two years ago I drew back on a doe that had stepped out into a clearing I was about to enter, and my Rage was dangling! Somewhere along the way I'd clipped a branch or something.

I now consider fixed blades the only option for me unless I want to totally change how I hunt - which I don't.
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Old 07-31-2020, 07:48 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I would get a couple of different spine gold tips and then get their weight system. You can screw weight to the back of the insert. You go in from the nock. It might be a little time consuming but better than buying a bunch of arrows that are wrong.
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