Need advice on heartworms - Mississippi Hunting and Fishing Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-14-2020, 09:59 AM   #1 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 677
Default Need advice on heartworms

My son recently took on a 4.5 yr large cur (original mountain cur). He's a good squirrel/coon dog, and we've taken to him. When we got him he was VERY skinny, and over 3-4 weeks I was able to put 10 lbs on him, and he's looking really good. His energy is good, and he's already given us several great hunts (I'm tired of cleaning squirrels!) lol

Anyway, took him in for full checkup, shots, etc, and he was diagnosed with heartworms. It may as well be coronavirus as far as what I know about it. I have ZERO experience with this condition. So I'm here asking for advice.

What do we do now?

thanks!
jakesnake66 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-14-2020, 11:28 AM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Thibodaux, LA
Posts: 1,483
Default

Our lab had heart worms for a few years. A truck killed her before the worms did. She was 10. I’m not saying don’t get her treated for them but we opted not to treat her and she lived normal until she was hit.

Last edited by Rancher; 02-14-2020 at 11:31 AM.
Rancher is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2020, 12:17 PM   #3 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 61
Default

Several years ago I went with the treatment on a 7 year old lab. Bout a grand total and a difficult process. (kennel kept for months, etc) Treatment seemed to work in the heart. But the damage done and worms in lungs killed her a little less than a year after treatment. Like Rancher, I'm certainly not saying don't have him treated but I won't do it again (hopefully never have to make the decision)
Pilgrim is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2020, 03:23 PM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Starkville
Posts: 2,891
Default

A lot depends on how advanced the worms are. If they are fully grown and have clogged the heart, yea treatment can be long and expensive. However, if they are still small they can be poisoned with a drug the vet gives you. Dog has to stay calm for a few days while they dissolve. I went through the latter treatment with a lab I had several decades ago
DoyleAlley is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2020, 04:01 PM   #5 (permalink)
jlt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,033
Default

Needs to be staged and treated with immiticide says the vet that I sleep with every night.
jlt is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2020, 12:28 PM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 677
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlt View Post
Needs to be staged and treated with immiticide says the vet that I sleep with every night.
Lol, what a great benefit for a hunter - veterinarian spouse!

Since posting here I've reached out to a few others with experience, including two vets, and the answers are absolutely split among THREE basic options:

- no treatment at all, as Rancher and Pilgrim mention (I know you're not *endorsing*, just raising as a possibility). This isn't an uncommon choice it seems.

- ivermectin-based meds along with antibiotics, aka the "slow kill" method. My mother cured 3 dogs with this approach. It took about one year for the dogs to test heartworm free. However, the American Heartworm Association does not endorse this method because if the heartworms are adult the damage to organs continues throughout the treatment, and some dogs take up to 2 years to get cleared.

- immiticide, aka the "fast kill" method. People feel very strongly about this one it seems. It's the preferred method for the AHA, but some say it's too hard on the dog, and sometimes high-energy, specialized work/hunting dogs do poorly on it because of the stress of being kept in a kennel or at the vet's. It's also by far the most expensive.

There are pros and cons to each approach. Frankly, right now I don't know what to do. It's my 22-year-old son's dog, but I've fallen in love with this beautiful animal. "Shine" has a great disposition, very friendly and affectionate, and he hunts VERY hard. I really didn't know what a beast these dogs are. I walk him around our property 3-4 times every day, and he's just an athlete!

For Luke's part, he has been extremely attentive, and has already proved he will be an excellent owner. He's been squirrel hunting with dogs for several years, and the past 3 years he's run other hunters' dogs for them. Today he received Shine's new collar - an amazing example of modern technology, btw, lol - and I swear he was like a kid at Christmas! He paid for it with no help from me (WOW those things are expensive!).

Not sure why I got into all that, but the point is we love the dog and we want him to live a long, happy, rewarding life doing what he was bred to do.
jakesnake66 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2020, 04:41 PM   #7 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 647
Default

I had a female lab get heartworms at 3 years old in 2006. They were fairly advanced and I wanted to save her but didnít have much cash at the time in college. I donít know what the vet gave her but he said it might kill her. $65 in Ď06. One treatment. He said to keep her penned for a month and do whatever I could to keep her calm.

It was rough on her but worms went away and she pulled through and died last year at 16 years old.
MattK is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2020, 08:40 PM   #8 (permalink)
MsH
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 188
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jakesnake66 View Post
My son recently took on a 4.5 yr large cur (original mountain cur). He's a good squirrel/coon dog, and we've taken to him. When we got him he was VERY skinny, and over 3-4 weeks I was able to put 10 lbs on him, and he's looking really good. His energy is good, and he's already given us several great hunts (I'm tired of cleaning squirrels!) lol

Anyway, took him in for full checkup, shots, etc, and he was diagnosed with heartworms. It may as well be coronavirus as far as what I know about it. I have ZERO experience with this condition. So I'm here asking for advice.

What do we do now?

thanks!
A trained combo dog is worth thousands. I will never understand why someone would take the time to raise and train such a dog, yet not be willing to invest in minimal feed and vet care.

My advice is to take your vet's advice.

If you don't trust your vet, get a second opinion from another vet.
MsH is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2020, 09:28 PM   #9 (permalink)
jlt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,033
Default

MsH gives good advice
jlt is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2020, 11:18 PM   #10 (permalink)
Tjc
Senior Member
 
Tjc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,990
Default

I’ve killed a dog with heart worms by giving them the correct dosage of ivermectin. I bought a beagle years ago that was about 2 years old and I gave it the correct dosage according to weight, it was dead within 24 hours. My father-in-law brought his lab to a vet years ago who killed him within a week after giving the fast kill treatment. I haven’t had another dog get heart worms in the last 10 years but if it happens to me again I will do the slow kill low dosage ivermectin treatment. Slowly increasing the dosage each month until it is the correct dosage for the weight of the dog. Maybe start with 1/4 of the correct dosage and with each treatment increase it just a little. The idea is to kill a few worms at a time instead of killing a pile of worms all at once and clogging the heart. I have never had a dog get heart worms when I start treating them at 6 months old with 1cc per 100 pounds of weight. A 50 pound dog will get 1/2 cc. I do not treat my dogs monthly. I do it every 2 months. I’ve read that it takes 3 months for heart worms to mature into fully grown worms. So at every other month I feel it’s easier on the dog and it still kills the worms before they grow into adult worms. The warm months are the worst time for heart worms because it is spread through mosquito bites. Jake, y’all have a tough decision to make. I wouldn’t want to be in your shoes.
Tjc is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mississippi Hunting and Fishing Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in



Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.